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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
signals, and then we are off. >> reporter: in most of america, u.p.s. drivers spend a lot of time behind the wheel. not tony. he parks his truck less than two miles away for the whole day. >> i prefer to park and uh let my legs do the work, you know what i mean? >> reporter: today, tony is lucky to have the help of angel tirado, a seasonal worker. so, it's angel who delivers dozens of heavy boxes to a garment warehouse. meanwhile, tony minds the truck and gets ready for the next delivery, offering up some tips of the trade: like the importance of making friends in the buildings. >> at least once a week, every one of my freight guys, they're going to get a coffee from me. once in a while, you know, i'll go get like a couple of sandwiches. i mean, they make my life a whole lot easier. i want them liking me! >> reporter: after a while, i persuade tony to let me deliver two packages to a building across the street. that means, i'm also responsible for the diad-- the electronic clipboard tracking all the packages. i have two packages for you. >> great. >> reporter: and i need you to sign. wit
layoffs across corporate america. the nation's job market may not be robust, but it's not frozen, either. in fact, today, the payroll firm a.d.p. reported 118,000 new private sector jobs were added in november, fewer than in october. the blame for last month's slowdown in hiring falls squarely on hurricane sandy, not on any new or widespread weakness in the economy. >> i would expect that by december, we're going to see some bounce back. much of the disruption from sandy was people simply not being able to get to work or firms not employing people that they ordinarily would have. >> reporter: friday, the government will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming we
positive this week on a few big banks, helping fuel an extended rally. bank of america, for example. today's 2.9% rally comes on top of a huge jump this year. b-of-a shares have more than doubled since january, and they continue to break out to 18- month highs on stronger than average volume. after the close, the market focus was on research in motion. with its newest blackberry device due out early next year, the stock has been rallying, even as the company continues to lose money. but the silver lining is that it didn't lose as much money as feared in its latest quarter, and it generated more revenue than was anticipated. on its conference call tonight, the company said the quarter was a reflection of "the successful transition the company is making," even though it acknowledged losing one million blackberry device customers. investors and traders have been betting on the transition. the stock was up 3.6% during the regular session, closing at its highest price since march. and then, in extended hours trading after reporting its quarterly results, the stock added another 7%, trading over
for america's highest earners, house republicans strongly oppose: >> instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> tom: congress and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal cliff's tax hikes and spending cuts take effect. >> susie: mark zandi says "bad things will happen to the economy pretty fast" if lawmakers don't settle the fiscal cliff issue. he's chief economist of moody's analytics. so mark falling off the fiscal cliff means bad things. how bad? >> it could be quite bad, susie. i don't think it's if we get into january and we haven't settled this but if house makers haven't nailed this down by early february, i think stock investors, bond investors will start to get very very nervous, start selling, risky businesses pull back and by the end of february when we start approaching the ceilin
need? >> mike: ask him. i've often asked why i spend so much of my time crisscrossing america reporting on and talking to small business owners. well, the answer is really pretty simple: look, the u.s. economy has become centered on high finance, meaning major banks, corporations and wall street. that's fine. except that it's the blood, sweat and tears of small business people that have made this country what it is today. it's a that same blood, sweat and tears that will get us where we want to go. these are our stories, this is who we are. i mike hegedus. thanks for joining us for this "n.b.r." special edition, made in america. see you online at nbr.com and right back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> join us anytime at nbr.com. there, you'll find full episodes of the program, complete show transcripts and all the market stats. also follows us on our facebook page at bizrpt. and on twitter @bizrpt. chorus: hodie christus natus est ♪ hodie salvator apparuit ♪ ♪ hodie in terra canunt angeli ♪ ♪ can
, or lower class it shouldn't be any class, it should be america coming together and right now in our house that's a big cause of debate. >> reporter: but washington isn't a source of optimism these days. >> if they make a deal it certainly won't be a good one, they'll say this is something we've got to get done and i don't think it's going to be using any brain power to do it. >> reporter: already there is growing talk in washington of a so-called mini-deal. >> let's hope they do. the president was serious. he was friendly in the statement he made-- >> he's going on vacation. he's going to hawaii. >> susan: yeah, but there's an urgency here, and do you think we are going to be any closer to getting a deal done? >> the president really scaled back his ambitions for the immediate time. he said, look, guys, nancy pelosi, come back, try to do the minimum, try to do the least amount of harm. and then come up with some way to say that we'll address bigger issues in the new year. >> he proposed tonight a smaller package, a smaller deal. what will this mean for the economy? what will it mean for
, but would not raise taxes on america's highest earners, the biggest sticking point. the two sides seem to be allowing themselves room to bargain. the president said today he'd be open to lowering tax rates for high earners later next year as part of a broad tax reform package. and senate republican leader mitch mcconnell did not directly endorse the g.o.p. plan. for now, house speaker boehner put the ball in the president's court, releasing a statement: "the president now has an obligation to respond with a proposal that can pass both chambers of congress." >> susie: we turn tonight to other opinions on the fiscal cliff impasse. we talk with the chairman of the national governor's association, and we also hear from a leading advocate for responsible fiscal policy. we begin with governor jack markell, the democrat from delaware. he was one of six governors meeting with president obama today to talk about how the fiscal cliff impacts their states. i asked him what was his message to the president. >> our message was pretty straightforward. we believe that it is important that governors h
's special. you don't see that in retailing in america. >> reporter: stores like sur la table are expected to be one of the few bright spots in an otherwise lackluster holiday season for merchants. in fact, some experts think home goods will be hotter than toys this holiday season. ibm projects home goods will see the strongest sales growth this year, up over 6%. that's far more than toys and electronics. >> you may ask yourself, why home? we think home is up because of a lot of things-- things like the changing demographic of the home itself. there's a stat that says that 41% of those between 25 and 29 are living back at home. >> reporter: but there also a second reason. >> we think that this holiday people are buying what they need vs. what they want. >> reporter: which had me wondering what's on jack schwefel's wish list this holiday season. it wasn't this $5,500 coffee maker. >> there are some new knives that i'm actually pretty excited about, so probably those. they're cutting board material actually used in the handle of the knives. >> reporter: and there's no denying it will look go
-sized crop. that and what we see out of the harvest in south america will determine the price for grain in 2013. >> tom: a look at the commodities and the federal reserve. lincoln ellis with us, werethe strategic financial group. and the federal reserve's big move. and that looming fiscal cliff, we'll have an update on that tomorrow. >> susie: investors were on fed-watch, tom, and it was very interesting watching the blue chip dow average as ben bernanke was giving his press conference. the dow got as high at 80 points, and the more he talked about the fiscal cliff and other issues facing the economy, it went down, down, down, closing down three points. >> tom: any of the enthusiasm that came out when the federal reserve announced it was going to continue to buy bonds slowly deflated throughout the afternoon, the longer the chairman tended to speak. there was less enthusiasm about what the federal reserve is doing. maybe less concern about why the federal reserve is doing it. let's go ahead and take a look at our "market focus." the major stock indices couldn't hold on to their midday g
institutions including barclays, bank of america, and societe generale. >> susie: uncle sam may soon be exiting the auto business. the treasury department said today it will sell its remaining and controversial stake in general motors, in the next 15 months. as part of the deal, g-m will buy back $5.5 billion in shares, and that will happen by the end of this year. g.m. stock revved higher on the news, climbing 7% to $27 a share. and, as suzanne pratt reports, some investors like the sound of an independent g.m. >> reporter: it looks like general motors may soon be hitting the road all by itself. four years after spending nearly $50 billion to rescue the struggling automaker, the u.s. treasury wants out. and, gm needed to shake off the stigma of being known as government motors. >> general motors to wanted do this. they wanted to get the government off its back so to speak and to prove to the people they can pay back the loan, part of the loan. >> reporter: other auto experts says everyone involved wanted to end this year on a positive news note. >> it helps the folks at gm and the government e
for the christmas holiday, so we bring you a christmas treat, "made in america." it's a special edition looking at unique companies, big and small, building jobs and community. when it comes to christmas decorations, americans on average spend $50 decking the halls. allison worrell takes us on the job with a hired hand helping roll out the holiday cheer. >> reporter: snowy scenes like this one are what many americans think about when it comes to a picturesque holiday season. but clear skies, sandy beaches, and highs in the 70's? not so much. and when you think about holiday decorating, florida probably isn't the first place that comes to mind either, but the holiday decor business is doing quite well in the sunshine state. >> the clients we're calling on are the rich and famous. they're professional athletes, they're industry leaders, and we're in the business of complete sales, service and installation for these types of people. >> reporter: david shindler has been in the christmas business for more than 20 years. he's a franchisee at holiday decorating firm christmas decor. >> we'll custom de
becoming all too familiar in corporate america and that is a -- an alleged affair with a 29-year-old subordinate and there's not a single metric you can look at for best buy that gives you a lot of confidence in the future of the actual core of the business. and bryan dunn c.e.o. is responsible for that. >> your top four worst c.e.o.'s of 2012. cindy finkelstein put the list together with dartmouth. thank you. >> >> susie: tomorrow we'll look at two leaders, who almost made sydney finkelstein's list of worst c.e.o.s. for more on executive behavior, head to: www.nbr.com, our "nbr- u" partners at vanderbuilt have research on the six mental mistakes every leader makes. tis the season for making predictions. what will stocks do next year, how will the economy fare? and, what will be the nation's top spice or flavor? believe it or not, spicemaker mccormick and company issues an annual "flavor forecast," designed for restaurants and homes. suzanne pratt met with the man behind the tastes, mccormick's top chef, and got a close-up "smell". >> reporter: here's how american's spiced up the
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)